4 weeks ago

Mortons Neuroma Symptoms

Overview

Morton neuromaMorton's neuroma is an inflammation of the nerves in the foot that go to the toes. Although the name includes the word ?neuroma,? it is not really a tumor. It can affect any of the toes in the foot. However, it most often affects the nerves that run between the third and fourth, or second and third toes.

Causes

A Morton's Neuroma is not a true neuroma, which is a tumor that is generally benign. Rather, it is an enlargement of the nerve where it goes between the metatarsal

2 months ago

Will Accessory Navicular Syndrome Need Surgery

Overview

Everyone has one navicular bone: one of the small bones of the foot. A small number of people have a second small navicular bone or piece of cartilage located on the inside of the foot just above the arch: both are simply called an "accessary navicular bone." It is located within the posterior tibial tendon which attaches in this area. It is easy to see as a "bump." Most that have it never have pain. If they get pain, we call it: "Accessary navicular bone syndrome."

Accessory Navicular

Causes

This painful foot condition is caused by an extra bone in the foot called the accessory navicular. Only about 10% of people have this bone (4 to 21%), and not all of them will develop any symptoms. The navicular bone is one of the normal tarsal bones of the foot. It is located on the inside of the foot, at the arch.

Symptoms

This painful condition is called accessory navicular syndrome. Accessory navicular syndrome (ANS) can cause significant pain in the mid-foot and arch, especially with activity. Redness and swelling may develop over this bony prominence, as well as extreme sensitivity to pressure. Sometimes people may be unable to wear shoes because the area is too sensitive.

Diagnosis

Usually, you will only need an X-ray to determine the size or type of the accessory navicular bone or the amount of medial navicular tuberosity hypertrophy. Be cognizant of stress fractures which may be duplicated as a hairline fracture or increased calcification. When treating children, always look for avascular necrosis of the navicular (Kohler?s disease). An X-ray of this condition will reveal a flattening of the navicular along with increased bone density.

Non Surgical Treatment

In order to strengthen your muscles to prevent further injury and to provide support to the foot, your podiatrist may also outline a physical therapy routine and prescribe orthotics. Orthotics will provide support to the arch of your foot, although they must be carefully crafted in order to make room for that pesky extra bone you?ve got poking about.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

For patients who have failed conservative care or who have had recurrent symptoms, surgery can be considered. Surgical intervention requires an excision of the accessory navicular and reattachment of the posterior tibial tendon to the navicular. Often times, this is the only procedure necessary. However, if there are other deformities such as a flat foot or forefoot that is abducted, other procedures may be required.

2 months ago

Foot Accessory Navicular Excision

Overview

Everyone has one navicular bone: one of the small bones of the foot. A small number of people have a second small navicular bone or piece of cartilage located on the inside of the foot just above the arch: both are simply called an "accessary navicular bone." It is located within the posterior tibial tendon which attaches in this area. It is easy to see as a "bump." Most that have it never have pain. If they get pain, we call it: "Accessary navicular bone syndrome."

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

2 months ago

Do I Suffer Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Overview

Sometimes, feet do weird things. For instance, about 10% of the general population?s feet have decided that having an extra bone in the mix is a really great idea. This extra bone (or sometimes a bit of cartilage), is called an accessory navicular. It shows up in a tendon called the posterior tibial tendon (which is a fancy name - but just remember, it helps support the arch of the foot) on the middle of the inside of the foot, just above the arch. This extra little bone is present from birth, so it?s not something that?ll suddenly grow later in life. Now, accessory navicular syndrome is when that extra bone starts causing issues with your shoe-wearing, or even the shape and function of your foot. It?s the syndrome you want to worry about, not necessarily the extra bone itself.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

The syndrome may result from any of the following, previous trauma such as a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear causing friction against the bone. Strain from overuse or excessive activity.

Symptoms

Adolescence is a common time for the symptoms to first appear. This is a time when bones are maturing and cartilage is developing into bone. Sometimes, however, the symptoms do not occur until adulthood. The signs and symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome include a visible bony prominence on the midfoot (the inner side of the foot, just above the arch) Redness and swelling of the bony prominence. Vague pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch, usually occurring during or after periods of activity.

Diagnosis

Plain x-rays are used to determine the size of the accessory navicular. There are three main types of accessory navicular bones: a small bone embedded within the nearby posterior tibial tendon; a triangular shaped bone connected to the navicular by thick cartilage; and a large prominent navicular tuberosity thought to represent an accessory navicular that has fused to the navicular. If the status of the posterior tibial tendon needs to be assessed or if other problems are suspected, (ex. Navicular stress fracture) it may be necessary to perform an MRI. Although this is not considered routine, an MRI may be helpful in identifying the degree of irritation. An MRI would demonstrate fluid or edema that may accumulate in the bone as a result of the irritation.

Non Surgical Treatment

Treatment options for a painful accessory navicular can include anti-inflammatory medications, rest, arch support structures in the shoe, or use of a cast or splint. Severe cases may require surgery.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment

The Kidner procedure involves resecting the prominent accessory navicular and ensuring that the posterior tibial tendon is still attached to the bone. Often the prominent bone can simply be shelled out from its position relative to the posterior tibial tendon, which leaves the tendon intact. However, if the tendon is loose and floppy once the extra bone has been removed, suturing or tother is required as a means of attaching it into the remaining navicular bone.

2 months ago

Is Accessory Navicular Syndrome Dangerous

Overview

As many as 14% of people have an ?accessory? or extra bone or piece of cartilage on the inner side of the foot. An accessory navicular is an inborn condition that affects only a minority of the population. It is not part of normal bone structure and therefore is not present in most people. It may be found when the foot is x-rayed for other reasons, or when irritation develops. Patients may not be aware of it until a change in their activity, growth spurt or new footwear creates friction. Most cases of accessory navicular syndrome are treated conservatively.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Causes

An accessory navicular develops as a result of a congenital anomaly and is found more often in women. If the bone is large, it may rub against a shoe, causing pain. Because of its location, the posterior tibial tendon may pull on the bone during walking or running, causing the fibrous tissue that connects the accessory navicular to the navicular to tear and become inflamed.

Symptoms

Most people with an accessory navicular do not have symptoms because the bone is so small that it causes no harm, or only develop symptoms after a trauma such as a break or sprain. When symptoms are present they could be a visible bony prominence, pain and throbbing, inflammation and redness, and flat feet.

Diagnosis

Keep in mind there are two different types of accessory navicular bones, which you can distinguish by getting a weightbearing AP X-ray of the foot. Dwight has classified type I as a small, round and discreet accessory bone just proximal to the main navicular bone. Geist described the type II accessory bone, which is closely related to the body of the navicular but separated by an irregular plate of dense fibro-cartilage.

Non Surgical Treatment

Initial treatment is conservative. With the first episode of symptoms, a medial heel wedge, anti-inflammatories, and physical therapy can be helpful. If very painful, a cast or boot may be needed for a short period time before the wedge and physical therapy can be initiated. Very rarely is a steroid injection warranted or recommended. As the pain improves, patients can resume activities. For a minority of patients, an arch support or custom orthotic can help to take some of the extra pressure off of the accessory navicular and the posterior tibial tendon.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment

After the anesthesia is administered you will be heavily sedated and placed on your stomach. Surgeons will place a tourniquet around your thigh and an incision will be made on the inside of the foot. The posterior tibial tendon will be moved as necessary and the accessory navicular will be removed. Surgeons will repair the posterior tibial tendon with sutures or suture anchors, and the wound will be closed. A splint will be placed on the foot for stabilization and immobilization. You will be permitted to leave the surgical center once you have been cleared by the anesthesiologist. Plan ahead to have a friend or family member take your prescription to a pharmacy to pick up your post-op medication. Use narcotic pain medications before bed or if numbness in your foot begins to dull. Schedule a post-op visit for 4 weeks after the procedure.